Monday, June 27, 2016

Robotics Camp is Coming Up - Register Your Child Today!



Summer 2016 is here. It's time to secure your child's spot in The Academy of 21st Century Learning Summer Camps!

Register HERE Today!

Camps for the Week of July 11th - 14th, 2016:

Robotics
Gr K - 3
Gr 4 - 11
Long the stuff of dreams for science fiction writers and their readers, functioning robots have finally become a reality! Utilizing basic computer programming skills, students will be challenged to design and build robots that will be able to perform such tasks as running an obstacle course, following road courses, and picking up objects. As their proficiency with coding increases, students will be able to create more and more complex robot activities.



Here are some facts:

  • Most students lose about two months of what they learned in math over the summer months.
  • Low-income students lose more than two months in reading achievement.
  • Parents consistently say that summer is the most difficult time to ensure that their children have productive things to do.
  • Our children’s’ need to learn does not end in May when the school doors close. They need to stay active and engaged, which also helps them stay on track academically when they return to school in August.

For a detailed list of camps, please visit our website at http://academy21learning.com/summercamps.html 
or call (707) 474-4710.

We look forward to Learning Academy Style together!

Saturday, June 25, 2016

Why Do Our Bodies Age? - Monica Menesini



Human bodies aren’t built for extreme aging: our capacity is set at about 90 years. But what does aging really mean, and how does it counteract the body’s efforts to stay alive? Monica Menesini details the nine physiological traits that play a central role in aging.

Lesson by Monica Menesini, animation by Cinematic.

Wednesday, June 22, 2016

Register Your Child for Summer Camp - Junior Architects and Puppetry Camps June 27th - 30th!



Summer 2016 is here. It's time to secure your child's spot in The Academy of 21st Century Learning Summer Camps!

Register HERE Today!

Camps for the Week of June 27th - 30th, 2016:

Junior Architects
Gr K - 3
Lego • Math • Building
Join us in this hands-on class and, together with your fellow Lego lovers, design and build various machines, catapults, pyramids, derby cars, and other amazing contraptions using your cherished LEGOS and building talents. In addition to practice with concepts in physics and engineering, students will develop problem-solving and critical thinking skills in collaboration with other students as they strive to assemble increasingly complex and interesting structures.

Puppetry
 Gr 4 - 9
Drama/Theater • Creative Writing • Public Speaking 
Calling all Puppeteers! Unleash your imagination and story-telling skills and enjoy a unique experience in personal expression. Explore and develop characters and stories connecting with various themes expressed through theatrical and dramatic exercises. Create puppet characters and scenery and make them come to life in your own original story. And then comes the really fun part: perform on stage for the enjoyment of one and all and upload it to YouTube to share with your friends!

Here are some facts:

  • Most students lose about two months of what they learned in math over the summer months.
  • Low-income students lose more than two months in reading achievement.
  • Parents consistently say that summer is the most difficult time to ensure that their children have productive things to do.
  • Our children’s’ need to learn does not end in May when the school doors close. They need to stay active and engaged, which also helps them stay on track academically when they return to school in August.

For a detailed list of camps, please visit our website at http://academy21learning.com/summercamps.html 
or call (707) 474-4710.

We look forward to Learning Academy Style together!

Sunday, June 19, 2016

The Evolution of the Book - Julie Dreyfuss



What makes a book a book? Is it just anything that stores and communicates information? Or does it have to do with paper, binding, font, ink, its weight in your hands, the smell of the pages? To answer these questions, Julie Dreyfuss goes back to the start of the book as we know it to show how these elements came together to make something more than the sum of their parts.

Lesson by Julie Dreyfuss, animation by Patrick Smith.

Thursday, June 16, 2016

The Argument for Summertime Tutoring


When the school year ends, many students also stop receiving tutoring. While this may be fine for some students, for students that are receiving tutoring in order to catch up with their classmates, this summer vacation from tutoring can have a negative affect on their progress. This article discusses why students should continue to receive tutoring during the summer and how tutoring companies should adjust to offer summertime tutoring.

Hermann Ebbinghaus was a German psychologist best known for his research related to memory and learning. Ebbinghaus discovered what he called the forgetting curve which shows how the rate at which information is forgotten over time. The forgetting curve shows that people quickly forget newly learned information unless they review that information within a short time-frame. After reviewing it once they can go a bit longer without forgetting it, but need to review it again in a few days to retain it. If the information is not reviewed again in several days it will be forgotten. Each time the information is reviewed, it takes longer and longer for the information to be forgotten.

How does this relate to students and summer tutoring? In order for students to remember what they have learned they must repeat the material frequently at first and less frequently over time. Summer vacation is a two month period where the student does not review any material if they aren't receiving tutoring. Much of the subject matter they were introduced to during the last month or two of school will quickly be forgotten if they don't review it during the summer months. As a result they will have to relearn this material at the start of the new school year. For many students this won't be a problem since other students have also forgotten what they learned the previous year; however, students that are already having difficulty keeping up with their classmates should take advantage of the summer to review and consolidate their knowledge so that when they start the new school year they will be at the same level or higher than their classmates.

In order for students to at least maintain the knowledge they gained during the last couple months before summer vacation, the forgetting curve suggests that they continue to review the material frequently for the first couple weeks of summer vacation and then less frequently further into the vacation.

Tutoring companies can encourage students to continue receiving tutoring during the summer by sharing the information mentioned above with parents. Most parents can quickly recognize the value of maintaining the knowledge their children have already gained and giving them a head start for the new school year. Companies can also tailor their summer schedules to match the Ebbinghaus forgetting curve with more frequent tutoring sessions at the start of the summer followed by less frequent tutoring sessions later in the summer.

Many families have irregular schedules during the summer and will be gone for vacation at various times. It's important to be flexible with your students' summer tutoring while maintaining the appropriate frequency and spacing of tutoring sessions to maintain your student's knowledge.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Christie_M_Van_Arragon/1182196

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6579500

Monday, June 13, 2016

The Pleasure of Poetic Pattern - David Silverstein



Humans are creatures of rhythm and repetition. From our breath to our gait: rhythm is central to our experience, and often brings us pleasure. We can find pleasure in the rhythm of a song, or even the rows of an orchard. Of course, too much repetition can also backfire. David Silverstein describes what poetic repetition is and why it works.

Lesson by David Silverstein, animation by Avi Ofer.

Friday, June 10, 2016

6 Ways to Prevent Summer Learning Loss


Did you know that many kids experience a phenomena called Summer Learning Loss every year? Essentially, they forget the information they learned in the previous school year over the summer months. In fact, studies have shown that kids lose an average of over 2.6 months worth of math skills in the summertime. For kids that were already struggling in a subject like math, this means that they will start off the next school year even further behind.

During the summer months, kids are less likely to practice any time of mathematical computations. Most will not practice math skills outside any formal classroom setting. Other subjects such as reading, also show a learning loss as well. In reading, students will lose an average of 1 month of learning.

Think of your favorite sport. Pick your favorite basketball, football, or soccer player. What would happen if they did not continue to train and exercise during off-season? They would then return to their sport and experience a lag in their performance. The brain is no different. It too, needs to be exercised.

So how can you keep your kids learning over the summer? Here are a few simple ideas:

1. Purchase educational workbooks. These are available at most bookstores and many cities also have special teacher supply stores that carry great learning material. These products are geared towards different grades so you can customize to your children's level. It is recommended that your children do at least an hour a day.

2. Visit your local library. Find some books with topics that interest your child so that they are really engaged in reading. The library is a great place to promote the love of reading! Reading comprehension is highly important and most states have standardized testing based off of reading scores. Your librarian can suggest grade-level appropriate books that will keep your child's attention with the text.

3. Visit museums, zoos and other historical sites. Help your child learn about history by living it as a hand-on experience. Don't forget summer learning opportunities locally, in addition to your library. Check out museums, the zoo, aquariums, concerts and parks that you don't usually get to attend during the school year. Have them keep a journal (writing skills!) of their activities, and perhaps e-mail friends and relatives about what they are doing (again, stealth writing practice!)

4. The Internet can be your friend! Check out safe, parent-approved Internet sites. Many will offer crafts, worksheets, and even power-busters to keep the brain moving! Many lessons are broken down by grade level making it simple to cater to your child's needs. There are also websites that allow the child to 'play' when in reality, they are learning! This is also a great opportunity to bring in new material that will prepare them for the next grade level!

5. Check out your local newspaper and community! Most communities will hold writing camps, editor-in-training seminars, art and dancing classes and more. Log on to your city website and see what is being offered within your community.

6. Enroll into a summer tutoring or teaching program. For children that are struggling academically, summer can be the perfect time to address it with a customized tutoring program. The summer months are an excellent time for your child to fill in learning gaps or zoom ahead with enrichment activities at supplemental learning centers, or via tutors or last year's teacher. Your child's teacher is an excellent resource to give you ideas for summer books to read and math workbooks to complete in between play and television watching.

These ideas will help your child build up more confidence, and prepare them to start the new school with a bang! This is the opportunity to both stabilize and advance your child, what are you waiting for?

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Nicole_Allwein

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/4221539

Tuesday, June 7, 2016

Summer is Almost Here - Register for Camp Today!



Summer 2016 is almost here. It's time to secure your child's spot in The Academy of 21st Century Learning Summer Camps!

Here are some facts:

  • Most students lose about two months of what they learned in math over the summer months.
  • Low-income students lose more than two months in reading achievement.
  • Parents consistently say that summer is the most difficult time to ensure that their children have productive things to do.
  • Our children’s’ need to learn does not end in May when the school doors close. They need to stay active and engaged, which also helps them stay on track academically when they return to school in August.

For a detailed list of camps, please visit our website at http://academy21learning.com/summercamps.html 
or call (707) 474-4710.

We look forward to Learning Academy Style together!

Saturday, June 4, 2016

Can You Solve the Control Room Riddle? - Dennis Shasha



As your country's top spy, you must infiltrate the headquarters of the evil syndicate, find the secret control panel, and deactivate their death ray. But your reconnaissance team is spotty, and you have only limited information about the control panel's whereabouts. Can you solve the control room riddle and deactivate their weapon in time? Dennis Shasha shows you how.

Lesson by Dennis Shasha, animation by Zedem Media.

Wednesday, June 1, 2016

Summer School - Ways to Prevent the Summertime Backslide


Worried that your children will forget everything they learned over the course of the summer months away from school? You may have more reason than you think to fear the summer brain drain according to a study by Duke University's Dr. Harris Cooper, a leading expert on summer learning loss. He writes that long summer vacations "break the rhythm of instruction, lead to forgetting, and require a significant amount of review when students return to school in the fall."

According to Cooper's study, students' overall achievement test scores drop by about one month, on average, over summer vacation. Skills in mathematics and spelling usually take the biggest hits, with math skills suffering almost a 2.6 month loss in achievement.

Suffering the most are children from lower socioeconomic backgrounds, who are presented with less opportunities to practice math and reading skills over the summer months than their more privileged peers. Their reading comprehension skills suffer the greatest, and their losses add up to a 2 year achievement gap by the time they enter their middle school years.

There are steps that parents can take to help their children learn and even get ahead over the summer months. Some "Summer Educational Tips" will help transform the break from structured learning into an opportunity for students to sharpen their skills through fun and interactive ways. Follow these tips and send your children back to school smarter and more confident than when they left!

1. Take frequent trips to the library and register your child with a library card. University of Florida's Richard Allington notes that the best predictor of summer reading loss is a lack of books at home and limited access to library books, so keep a good selection of high interest, level appropriate books around the house. Schedule a consistent "reading time" daily for your child.

2. Attend thematic programs at the library. Libraries often host a great variety of summer programs for kids that celebrate reading.

3. Talk to your child's teachers and ask them what your child will be learning next year at school. This way you can tie in family trips with next year's curriculum to create a more meaningful hands-on experience. For example, if your child will be studying a unit on the civil war, plan a visit to Gettysburg.

4. Give your child a gift card to a bookstore, or give books as gifts.

5. Check out audio books from the library for your child to listen to stories in the car.

6. Consider Summer Tutoring: Tutoring services, such as in-home tutoring, can help children catch up or get ahead with one-on-one tutoring in the home. Take advantage of the summer months to remediate or accelerate your child in areas like reading comprehension, mathematics, writing or SAT/ACT test prep.

7. Research has revealed a direct connection between learning to play a musical instrument and an increased aptitude in mathematics. Consider introducing your child to music lessons over the summer.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Cari_Diaz

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/2435060