Sunday, August 13, 2017

Will the Ocean Ever Run Out of Fish? - Ayana Elizabeth Johnson and Jennifer Jacquet


When most people think of fishing, we imagine relaxing in a boat and patiently reeling in the day’s catch. But modern industrial fishing -- the kind that stocks our grocery shelves -- looks more like warfare. Ayana Elizabeth Johnson and Jennifer Jacquet explain overfishing and its effects on ecosystems, food security, jobs, economies, and coastal cultures.

Lesson by Ayana Elizabeth Johnson and Jennifer Jacquet, animation by Anton Bogaty.

Thursday, August 10, 2017

Tips to Get Your Kids Back on a School Routine


Did late-night sleepovers and extra free time throw off your kid’s schedule? Make a smooth transition into the new school year with these tips.

Monday, August 7, 2017

What Happens When You Have a Concussion? - Clifford Robbins


Each year in the United States, players of sports and recreational activities receive between 2.5 and 4 million concussions. How dangerous are all those concussions? The answer is complicated and lies in how the brain responds when something strikes it. Clifford Robbins explains the science behind concussions.

Lesson by Clifford Robbins, animation by Boniato Studio.

Friday, August 4, 2017

How to Prepare for Back to School


Ease your children back into their school schedule with these parent-tested tips.

Step 1: Reset their body clock
If your children have been staying up late and sleeping in all summer, reset their body clocks: Starting two weeks before school, send them to bed a little bit earlier every night -- and get them up a little earlier every morning -- until they're back on a school-day schedule.

Tip
Get them used to the impending morning rush by planning early-morning activities they'll want to jump out of bed for.

Step 2: Take them shopping
Take them shopping for school supplies and, if your budget permits, a few new back-to-school clothes. Let them have a say in the selection process to get them excited about the return to the classroom.

Step 3: Prepare their work area
Help them prepare the area where they'll be doing their homework, especially if they seem anxious about the upcoming year. Having a clean, organized space with some new supplies may help ease their nerves -- and might even get them excited about a fresh start.

Tip
Surprise them with a new electronic gadget that can be used to do homework. Check out websites like eBay and Craigslist for bargains.

Step 4: Set up playdates
Set up playdates with school friends they haven't seen all summer to remind them that the school year has its fun side.

Tip
If you're child is starting at a new school, see if it's possible to have them meet their new teacher before the school year starts.

Step 5: Cook ahead
Make double batches of meals now so you can quickly defrost dinner during those first hectic days.

Step 6: Tamp down your own fears
Keep any of your own anxieties about the upcoming school year to yourself. Children take their lead from you; if you seem composed, it may alleviate their own fears.

Did You Know?
Up to 18 percent of children display anxiety over returning to school in the fall that can lead them to be disruptive in class, according to one study.

Tuesday, August 1, 2017

The Power of Reading Aloud


It’s never too early to start reading aloud to your kids – and keep reading – even as your little ones get older. Scholastic Librarian Deimosa Webber-Bey and a group of young readers, aged 7-12, share their tips on making the most out of family read-alouds.

Saturday, July 29, 2017

The Left Brain vs. Right Brain Myth - Elizabeth Waters


The human brain is visibly split into a left and right side. This structure has inspired one of the most pervasive ideas about the brain: that the left side controls logic and the right side controls creativity. And yet, this is a myth, unsupported by scientific evidence. So how did this idea come about, and what does it get wrong? Elizabeth Waters looks into this long held misconception.

Lesson by Elizabeth Waters, animation by Daniel Gray.

Wednesday, July 26, 2017

How to Find the Ideal Tutor for Your Child


Finding the right tutor for your child can be a difficult and time-consuming task. There are a number of factors you must consider during the selection process and it can be difficult to evaluate some of these factors without your child actually receiving some tutoring from the tutor. This article will outline the steps you should follow when searching for a tutor for your child. I hope these steps will speed up your search process and help you find the ideal tutor for your child.

1. Determining the needs of your child

The first step in finding the ideal tutor for your child is to determine what type of help your child needs. If your child is weak in certain subject areas then you will likely benefit from finding tutors that specialize in those subjects. If your child has a learning disability then finding tutors specializing in learning methods for students with your child's learning disability will likely produce better results. It's also possible that you just want to help your child perform better in subjects across a wide range of subjects. Specifying the specific needs or combinations of needs for your child will help you narrow your focus when searching for qualified tutors.

2. Finding Qualified Tutors

You'll want to find several tutors that meet your requirements as established in the first step. At this stage you're just looking to build a list of companies to research further. There are several places you can look to find potential tutors. School guidance counselors are good resources - they are likely to know several tutoring companies in your area and can help you find tutors that meet your child's needs. Asking other parents with children is another good source for finding tutoring services. They may have experience with tutoring companies and can vouch for the quality of different tutoring services. Online tutoring directories are also an excellent resource. Tutoring directories tend to have a large selection of tutors, reviews and they allow you to search by city or subject.

3. Evaluating Tutors

You should now have a list of tutoring companies that meet your basic requirements (subjects, teaching methods, etc.). The next step is to go through the list and evaluate each tutoring service in more detail. Search online to see if the company has a website with more information. Search for reviews. In addition to your basic requirements there are other variables that you should consider such as the experience of the tutor, education, and their performance track record for past students. You can create a list of questions you want answered and call the tutoring company or tutor to find out the answers. Before you commit to anything you and your child should have a preliminary meeting with the tutor who would be teaching your child. This will help you evaluate how the tutor and your child interact, which can have a big impact on how well your child responds to the tutoring. After you have met with a few tutors weigh their strengths and weaknesses and make your final decision.

4. Agreeing on goals and measures

It's important to have established methods for evaluating performance. Many tutoring companies have their own systems in place for establishing a baseline and evaluating performance over time. If the company you select does not have a system like this in place you should bring this up and create a list of goals and how you will measure improvement. This might include increasing test scores by at least one grade, advancing to a higher reading grade, etc. Once the goals and measures have been established make sure you regularly check the performance of your student against the goals. Keep in mind that improvement isn't instant, but if your child still hasn't improved over a month or two you should probably meet with the tutor to discuss a different approach that will get results or you should begin searching for a different tutor.

Finding the ideal tutor for your child can be a time-consuming process, and it can be frustrating if you don't find a good tutor; however, by following the steps listed above you can greatly improve your odds of finding a good tutor on the first try.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Christie_M_Van_Arragon

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6569271

Sunday, July 23, 2017

Can You Find the Next Number in this Sequence? - Alex Gendler


1, 11, 21, 1211, 111221. These are the first five elements of a number sequence. Can you figure out what comes next? Alex Gendler reveals the answer and explains how beyond just being a neat puzzle, this type of sequence has practical applications as well.

Lesson by Alex Gendler, animation by Artrake Studio.

Thursday, July 20, 2017

How Journaling Benefits Your Child


Journal writing can help your children process feelings, build writing skills, and communicate their ideas.

Journaing encourages your child to grow while discovering open-ended writing. Instead of writing one assignment and being done, journal writing allows your child to write daily (or more!).

Not only can it be enjoyable and reflective, journaling also has multiple benefits related to literacy and social growth. Plus, you might just spark a fire in your budding writer!

Here are three great benefits of journaling, including tips for your child's further development.

1. Help Your Child Deal With Big Feelings

Remember that journal you had when you were a tween? The padded one with a kitten on the front that came with a lock? It also had a special key that you hid under your mattress.

The tween years can be filled with lots of emotions and new experiences. A private journal can be a safe place to record those new and brewing feelings. Many kids feel better when they can express their ideas and thoughts in a safe non-judgmental place. A private journal can help your child process her feelings.

Tip: Let your child pick out her very own journal. Plan a special outing to a bookstore that carries journals. Have your child select a journal that feels special to her. Explain that it will be a place for her to record her thoughts and also keep them private.

2. Improve Your Child's Writing Skills

Journaling builds writing skills. Just like basketball players, painters, and guitarists, the more we practice the better we get. Spelling, sentence structure, vocabulary, and grammar can all be enhanced through a regular writing habit.

Writing in journals allows your child to feel in control of the content he chooses to write about and the length of his writing pieces. This control and choice make writing more appealing to your child.

Tip: A curiosity journal is an interesting place for kids to record their observations and wonderings. The journal can be a simple notebook or a journal with blank pages. You child can keep his journal with him when setting out on an adventure — whether it's the backyard or a trip to a museum.

Have your child jot down things that interest him, or questions he has about his experiences. He can also fill the journal with drawings and sketches. Encourage him to label his drawings too.

3. Enhance Your Child's Communication Skills

Journaling helps communicate ideas through writing. Sometimes kids find it easier to express themselves through writing versus oral communication. And, developing written communication skills will be an asset as your child moves forward.

Children have to draw from their vocabulary bank to select precise words to communicate their thinking. Plus, they practice handwriting skills.

Tip: Try a dialogue journal. Have your child decorate a blank notebook with stickers or pictures from magazines. Take turns writing back and forth in the journal notebook with her. (Note: For those of you with crafty children, find out how to create a homemade journal from recycled materials.)

Begin by jotting a note to your child and ask her a question. These can be as simple as, “What do you want to do tomorrow?” or more personal such as, “When was a time you felt scared?” Then allow her to respond in writing. She can respond to your question, share her thoughts, or ask you a question. Have her leave the journal on the counter and tell her you'll respond the next day.

Journaling is full of academic and emotional growth opportunities for your children. So, grab a journal and introduce them to this new tool. Soon enough, they'll be writing volumes!

Article Source: http://www.scholastic.com/parents/blogs/scholastic-parents-raise-reader/how-journaling-benefits-your-child

Monday, July 17, 2017

The Benefits of Tutoring Services For Students


When it comes to learning, every student will be different in terms of what they excel in, what they struggle with and the ways in which they best learn new things. In the event that any child struggles with a specific subject or area of their curriculum, it is beneficial for them to utilize a tutoring service which can not only help benefit them academically, but can also help with their confidence which can benefit all aspects of their education.

One of the main reasons why a student may struggle in class can stem from the often fast-paced nature of classroom teaching. As teachers have only a set period of time in which to teach a curriculum and a vast number of students to focus on, some students may not receive the level of attention and help they require, or may be too embarrassed to speak up at times when they are struggling. This in turn can lead them to shy away and struggle in silence which can dramatically damage their confidence.

By looking to a tutoring service, your child will be provide with the one-on-one interaction they require so that they can be given the time and patience they need in order to understand their specified subject. Being able to learn at their own pace will not only help to ease their anxiety, but will also make it possible for them to understand and feel free to ask questions. One of the main issues that arise in classroom teaching is that a teacher will be unable to devote the same amount of time on every student. This means that even in the case that the child is excelling, they may not receive the praise and acknowledgment they need in order to remain focused and motivated. When visiting a tutorial centre, the child will be able to receive the praise and encouragement they desire, and will also be provided with thorough individual feedback. This is also beneficial for the parent as they will be given more insight as to which areas their child is struggling within which can therefore help them understand how to help in their child's education.

As we are all aware, we each learn in different ways meaning that while some may struggle to grasp some aspects of a subject, others will excel and speed ahead of us. By turning to the help of a tutoring service, students can develop a complete understanding of the basics of a subject. This can not only help them in learning their subject as a whole, but as mandatory testing processes can cause teachers to advance their teaching in order to prepare students for tests and examinations; it will mean that the student in question is not feeling too stretched, therefore their test results will not be affected. Should a student feel unprepared before a test, the help of a tutoring service can help them catch up with any lost areas, rehash areas they are unsure of and generally help them prepare for a test scenario.

The benefits of utilizing a tutorial service are multiple, but it is important that you as the parent complete thorough research to ensure that not only will your child get the best from their tutoring, but so that you are also offered a fair and competitive price. If your budget does not allow for a large fee, it is advantageous to use the web and community services to search for a voluntary tutorial service which will allow your child to benefit from additional help, without the worry of large fees.

Article Source: http://ezinearticles.com/expert/Jason_Kay/187105

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6475665

Friday, July 14, 2017

The Power of Creative Constraints - Brandon Rodriguez


Imagine you were asked to invent something new. It could be whatever you want, made from anything you choose, in any shape or size. That kind of creative freedom sounds so liberating, doesn’t it? Or ... does it? if you're like most people you’d probably be paralyzed by this task. Why? Brandon Rodriguez explains how creative constraints actually help drive discovery and innovation.

Lesson by Brandon Rodriguez, animation by CUB Animation.

Tuesday, July 11, 2017

Tips To Beat The Summer Learning Slide


Education expert Ann Dolin discusses how to prevent students from losing their reading and writing skills during Summer break.

Saturday, July 8, 2017

5 Read-Aloud Tips Inspired by "Where the Wild Things Are"


Make story time even more fun with these creative ideas inspired by Maurice Sendak’s classic title.

Maurice Sendak’s Where the Wild Things Are is a celebration of childhood, the wonder of imagination, and unfaltering parental love. And while children the world over connect with this story of a rebellious child feeling more than a little wild, I think it includes wonderful lessons for parents too. Some of them might make story time at your house (and mine) more fun than a wild rumpus!

1. Read With Enjoyment

When you read with enjoyment your child learns that reading is fun and pleasurable. This helps your child develop positive associations with a book, and a greater connection with you. A book like Where the Wild Things Are is easy to read with enjoyment thanks to both its relatable topic and simple prose.

However, keeping the enjoyment alive in your voice can be tricky when you are reading it (or any other favorite book) for the 447th time! It’s good to know then that re-reading a book is valuable — it boosts vocabulary development, phonemic awareness, and story comprehension.

2. Add a Little Drama to Story Time

You can add a little drama to story time with these three techniques: 1) use interesting character voices, 2) adjust the volume of your voice as you read, and 3) use a dramatic pause or two to good effect. When reading Where the Wild Things Are, my family loves growling with the wild things, “Oh, please don’t go — we’ll eat you up — we love you so!”

Creating a sense of drama as you read together helps your child associate books and reading with pleasure and good, old-fashioned fun.

3. Explore the Feelings and Emotions Evoked in the Story

Books provide easy openings for talking to your child about emotions and feelings in various contexts, helping your child in developing emotional intelligence.

Explore the emotions of Where the Wild Things Are together by making the faces you would make if you felt like Max — mad, out of control, lonely, loved or relieved. Or, ask your child when was the last time he felt each of the emotions from the story.

4. Ask Questions About What You’ve Read

Talking with your child about the story and asking questions about what you’ve read provides a simple way to gauge his level of comprehension of the story. You might include questions like:

  • How do you think Max feels when his mother sends him to his room?
  • Do you think a forest really grew in Max’s room? If not, what do you think really happened?
  • Max wanted to be where “someone loved him best of all." Why is it important to feel loved "best of all"?
  • Do you think the Wild Things are real? What's the difference between things that are real and things you dream about or imagine? What sort of things do you dream about?
  • What do you think was the most exciting part of the story?
  • Do you have a favorite illustration?

5. Respond Creatively to the Story

Books can provide a wonderful springboard for creativity. Your child's creative response can be as simple as a drawing or a painting inspired by the story. For Where the Wild Things Are you could also try:

  • Re-reading the story and, as you read, taking turns to act out the parts of Max and a Wild Thing.
  • Creating a Wild Thing mask from a paper plate and scraps of paper or fabric.
  • Making crowns and hosting your very own wild rumpus by dancing together to your favorite music.
  • Making a Max and some Wild Things figurines by decorating toilet rolls and taking turns re-telling the story.

The great thing about all these tips is that they will work just as well for almost any picture book you choose for your child's read aloud time. Choose one, two, or try all five, and add some fun, book-inspired learning to your next story time.

Article Source: http://www.scholastic.com/parents/blogs/scholastic-parents-raise-reader/5-read-aloud-tips-inspired-where-wild-things-are

Wednesday, July 5, 2017

How to Squeeze Electricity Out of Crystals - Ashwini Bharathula


It might sound like science fiction, but if you press on a crystal of sugar, it will actually generate its own electricity. This simple crystal can act like a tiny power source because sugar happens to be piezoelectric. Ashwini Bharathula explains how piezoelectric materials turn mechanical stress, like pressure, sound waves and other vibrations into electricity, and vice versa.

Lesson by Ashwini Bharathula, animation by Karrot Animation.

Sunday, July 2, 2017

Our Second Session of Summer Camp Begins July 10 - Register Today!


Academy of 21st Century Learning's Summer Camps 
Session 1: July 10 - August 4, 2017
4 weeks, 5 days a week, 3 hours per day
Monday - Friday, 9:00am - 12:00pm 
$650/month

1671 East Monte Vista, Suite N-106 
Vacaville, CA 95688 
707-474-4710 


Acadmey Kids - Preschool (2.5 years - 4 years)

Overview
Calling all kids! Come and explore the FUN of school as we study our letters, colors, shapes, and numbers. Children will explore the worlds of animals and plants. They will do fun experiments as they are introduced to functional numerical skills and the wonders of science. They will develop new vocabulary as they learn about community helpers and family members and will be encouraged to use simple reasoning to express everyday occurrences. They will build on their vocabulary skills by discussing stories being read and will begin to understand and follow simple directions. Our daily activities always reinforce age-appropriate social development. The students’ multiple skills will be enhanced by singing songs and playing relative games while incorporating routine structure into their activities and daily schedules. Our teachers encourage both independence, as your child learns to verbalize wants and needs and, very importantly, the role of inter-dependence as children are introduced to taking turns. This class with its educational experiences is the perfect way to introduce your child to the wonders of learning!

Acadmey Kindergarten (Gr K - Gr 1)

Overview
Sparkle your child’s imagination! It’s time to jump on the STEAM bandwagon for a sizzling Summer Kindergarten through Second Grade at The Academy! We will study rocks, plants, mixtures and solutions. In our final week, we will have an amazing and deliciously-fun Build-It Festival. The Festival will include a wide assortment of classroom learning-station activities which focus on mathematics relating to construction, geometric challenges, and spatial visualization. Activities will connect to the real world and even potential careers. Free exploration sets the stage for such mathematical challenges as Create-A-Shape, Bridge Design, Symmetry, Tangrams, and lots of amazing structures! Background on geometry is provided. Special materials include Lego’s, boxes, pattern blocks, more boxes, and more boxes. This program sounds like great fun, doesn’t it? We will also work on: Reading: letters, sight-words, fluency, and comprehension Math: writing numbers through 20, measurement, greater than & less than, and geometrical shapes & patterns Art: color mixing, water and oil painting outside in the park, create mosaics, and decorating T-shirts Music: dancing, singing Yoga: stretch and learn balance and focus Fieldtrips: The trips may not be far-away and exotic, but they will be fun and educational. Summers are very popular at The Academy. Whether your child has just finished or will start Kindergarten in the fall, this program will inspire them to do their best, because doing your best is fun!!

Summer STEM Mornings (2nd grade - 8th grade)

Overview
Some elementary school children struggled this year. Some did only what was demanded of them. Some sailed through the year without even trying. The rest fell somewhere in between. Regardless of where your 2ndd thru 8th grader* landed, our Summer STEM Mornings program will support, encourage, challenge, and motivate them. Whoever touted the old refrain “learning isn’t fun” never experienced The Academy of 21st Century Learning! Let’s take a peek at our one month program: Math: through Algebra Academic Reading Science: STEM projects & EXPERIMENTS!! For three hours a morning, Monday – Friday, 9AM – 12PM, your kids will laugh, learn, experiment, and challenge themselves. (No summer learning loss for your kids, but don’t tell them!) PLUS, over your family dinner table, you will hear about dissected cow eyes, frogs that dance,and a myriad of other scientific topics that will have them excited about learning. We know many of you were with us the last couple of years so … Welcome Back!!! *Unless special placement is approved by teacher

Thursday, June 29, 2017

Can You Solve the Fish Riddle? - Steve Wyborney


As the cargo director on the maiden voyage of the S.S. Buoyant, you’ve agreed to transport several tanks containing the last specimens of an endangered fish species to their new aquarium. Unfortunately, the boat is battered by a fierce storm, throwing your precious cargo overboard. Can you get the fish to safety and save the day? Steve Wyborney shows how.

Lesson by Steve Wyborney, animation by Artrake Studio.

Monday, June 26, 2017

Dissection of a Pig - The Lung


What we saw today at The Academy of 21st Century Learning was epic! Students from Kindergarten through 10th grade were immersed in the discovery of the majesty of life.

Having learned the different systems of the pig's body, students now experienced firsthand the complexities of life. Armed with scalpels, scissors, and tweezers, students dissected their fetal pigs.

At the end of the day, a different kind of student walked out of our doors: a student filled with self-confidence, pride of accomplishment, and humility. They knew they had been a part of something extraordinary.

Summer STEM Mornings, Session II starts July 10 - just 2 weeks away!

It will also feature hands-on learning through dissection and discovery.

There are VERY limited seats available!

To register your child, please call (707) 474-4710 or register online by visiting our website (click on the following): www.Academy21Learning.com, the click on "Camps"!

Friday, June 23, 2017

Make a Math Journal for Summer Learning

Inspire your kids to keep up their math skills this summer by creating an original math journal.


Editor's note: This post was originally published June 10, 2014.

During the summertime, it's essential for your child to practice math facts and keep up with her math skills. It's the best way to prevent the summer slide and ensure that she doesn't forget everything learned the previous school year during summer break.

A great way to get your child to incorporate math into her summer learning is to create a math journal. Here's how to create one with your child and encourage her to use it all summer long.

1. Create the journal. Together, you can buy or construct a math journal that your child will be proud of and want to write in each week. She can use a blank journal and decorate it, or a 3-ring binder with loose-leaf paper. However her journal is created, it's important that she make it her own.

2. Come up with journal questions or prompts. You can find math journal questions for your child online, or you can create your own. Questions can be simple and open-ended — allow your child to be creative in how she sees mathematics. Having a special place to explore ideas and write about math thinking is an excellent way to develop a strong math student.

You can also find problem-solving questions online or from a workbook that can be solved in the journal. These encourage precision and perseverance; it's important for her to realize that math isn't always fast.

Here are some sample journal prompts:

  • Today I saw math when I did…
  • Create a list of how I used math today.
  • What I know about ________ (ex: subtraction) is…
  • Write a poem about _________ (ex: fractions).
  • Research a mathematician and write a report about him/her.
  • My best day with math was…
  • My worst day with math was…
  • One math activity I enjoyed was ________ because…
  • My goal in math next year is…
  • Pretend I am a shape. What shape would I be and why?
  • Design a math bumper sticker.

3. Set a schedule. It's important to set a schedule during the summer for how long and how often your child will be working in her math journal. It can be daily or weekly, for 20 or 30 minutes — whatever you decide is best for your child. In no way should this feel like a chore! Setting up your guidelines ahead of time will help alleviate any resistance.

4. Have a journal party or sharing ceremony. To keep the math journal fun and exciting, consider having a journal party or ceremony where your child shares her work and journal responses. Children feel a great sense of pride and accomplishment when their time and efforts are validated. So remember to make it fun!

Article Source: http://www.scholastic.com/parents/blogs/scholastic-parents-learning-toolkit/make-math-journal-summer-learning

Tuesday, June 20, 2017

The Ferocious Predatory Dinosaurs of Cretaceous Sahara - Nizar Ibrahim


In Cretaceous times (around 100 million years ago), North Africa was home to a huge river system and a bizarre menagerie of giant prehistoric predators -- including the Spinosaurus, a dinosaur even more fearsome than the Tyrannosaurus rex. Nizar Ibrahim uses paleontological and geological data to reconstruct this “River of Giants” in surprising detail.

Lesson by Nizar Ibrahim, animation by Silvia Prietov.

Saturday, June 17, 2017

Considering Summer Tutoring?


Are you considering summer tutoring for your child? The end of the school year is approaching and many parents are thinking about preparing for a child's summer plans. If tutoring has crossed your mind here are a few things to consider about whether or not it's a good idea.

Summer tutoring can help a child with advancement or enrichment of subjects, preparation for standardized tests such as the SAT or ACT, review of foundations or concepts, and development of good study skills and habits. On the flip side, a child can view lessons as an unwanted activity that interferes with a carefree and fun summer.

If you decide that tutoring is necessary or preferred for your child there are ways to arrange lessons so that they don't prevent your child from having a great summer. It's important to incorporate fun and cool activities such as going to the pool, playing sports, creating art, and taking trips so that your child will have things to look forward to. Additionally, carefully select your tutor. Look for someone who has a good background and great personality. The chemistry and rapport between a tutor and your child will influence how your child will feel about lessons. In my own teaching experience, I try to make my lessons as fun and interesting as possible and a parent has told me that his daughter never complains about coming to our lessons together (he let me know that she complains about having to attend other activities).

Set aside a stable structure for lessons. Families often take a vacation or time off and this is fine but continuity of lessons is critical for progress. Don't cancel on lessons often or take them less seriously because it is summer. However, don't take them too seriously. If you take time off and reschedule a lesson don't apply extra pressure for the makeup. Slow and steady growth is ideal.

If you can't find the right tutor or your child revolts at the idea think about letting lessons slide. In my opinion, it is usually unproductive to force a child to do something when he or she is rebelling against it. This could also cause a negative feeling overall towards academics.

Summer lessons don't have to be viewed by your child as a nuisance. Learning should be seen as a positive experience.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Soumonie_Heng/603153

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/4038755

Wednesday, June 14, 2017

6 Ways to Prevent Summer Learning Loss


Did you know that many kids experience a phenomena called Summer Learning Loss every year? Essentially, they forget the information they learned in the previous school year over the summer months. In fact, studies have shown that kids lose an average of over 2.6 months worth of math skills in the summertime. For kids that were already struggling in a subject like math, this means that they will start off the next school year even further behind.

During the summer months, kids are less likely to practice any time of mathematical computations. Most will not practice math skills outside any formal classroom setting. Other subjects such as reading, also show a learning loss as well. In reading, students will lose an average of 1 month of learning.

Think of your favorite sport. Pick your favorite basketball, football, or soccer player. What would happen if they did not continue to train and exercise during off-season? They would then return to their sport and experience a lag in their performance. The brain is no different. It too, needs to be exercised.

So how can you keep your kids learning over the summer? Here are a few simple ideas:

1. Purchase educational workbooks. These are available at most bookstores and many cities also have special teacher supply stores that carry great learning material. These products are geared towards different grades so you can customize to your children's level. It is recommended that your children do at least an hour a day.

2. Visit your local library. Find some books with topics that interest your child so that they are really engaged in reading. The library is a great place to promote the love of reading! Reading comprehension is highly important and most states have standardized testing based off of reading scores. Your librarian can suggest grade-level appropriate books that will keep your child's attention with the text.

3. Visit museums, zoos and other historical sites. Help your child learn about history by living it as a hand-on experience. Don't forget summer learning opportunities locally, in addition to your library. Check out museums, the zoo, aquariums, concerts and parks that you don't usually get to attend during the school year. Have them keep a journal (writing skills!) of their activities, and perhaps e-mail friends and relatives about what they are doing (again, stealth writing practice!)

4. The Internet can be your friend! Check out safe, parent-approved Internet sites. Many will offer crafts, worksheets, and even power-busters to keep the brain moving! Many lessons are broken down by grade level making it simple to cater to your child's needs. There are also websites that allow the child to 'play' when in reality, they are learning! This is also a great opportunity to bring in new material that will prepare them for the next grade level!

5. Check out your local newspaper and community! Most communities will hold writing camps, editor-in-training seminars, art and dancing classes and more. Log on to your city website and see what is being offered within your community.

6. Enroll into a summer tutoring or teaching program. For children that are struggling academically, summer can be the perfect time to address it with a customized tutoring program. The summer months are an excellent time for your child to fill in learning gaps or zoom ahead with enrichment activities at supplemental learning centers, or via tutors or last year's teacher. Your child's teacher is an excellent resource to give you ideas for summer books to read and math workbooks to complete in between play and television watching.

These ideas will help your child build up more confidence, and prepare them to start the new school with a bang! This is the opportunity to both stabilize and advance your child, what are you waiting for?

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Nicole_Allwein

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/4221539

Sunday, June 11, 2017

Why Don't Perpetual Motion Machines Ever Work? - Netta Schramm


Perpetual motion machines — devices that can do work indefinitely without any external energy source — have captured many inventors’ imaginations because they could totally transform our relationship with energy. There’s just one problem: they don’t work. Why not? Netta Schramm describes the pitfalls of perpetual motion machines.

Lesson by Netta Schramm, animation by TED-Ed.

Thursday, June 8, 2017

Monday, June 5, 2017

Our First Session of Summer Camp Begins June 12 - Register Today!


Academy of 21st Century Learning's Summer Camps 
Session 1: June 12 - July 7, 2017
4 weeks, 5 days a week, 3 hours per day
Monday - Friday, 9:00am - 12:00pm 
$650/month

1671 East Monte Vista, Suite N-106 
Vacaville, CA 95688 
707-474-4710 


Acadmey Kids - Preschool (2.5 years - 4 years)

Overview
Calling all kids! Come and explore the FUN of school as we study our letters, colors, shapes, and numbers. Children will explore the worlds of animals and plants. They will do fun experiments as they are introduced to functional numerical skills and the wonders of science. They will develop new vocabulary as they learn about community helpers and family members and will be encouraged to use simple reasoning to express everyday occurrences. They will build on their vocabulary skills by discussing stories being read and will begin to understand and follow simple directions. Our daily activities always reinforce age-appropriate social development. The students’ multiple skills will be enhanced by singing songs and playing relative games while incorporating routine structure into their activities and daily schedules. Our teachers encourage both independence, as your child learns to verbalize wants and needs and, very importantly, the role of inter-dependence as children are introduced to taking turns. This class with its educational experiences is the perfect way to introduce your child to the wonders of learning!

Acadmey Kindergarten (Gr K - Gr 1)

Overview
Sparkle your child’s imagination! It’s time to jump on the STEAM bandwagon for a sizzling Summer Kindergarten through Second Grade at The Academy! We will study rocks, plants, mixtures and solutions. In our final week, we will have an amazing and deliciously-fun Build-It Festival. The Festival will include a wide assortment of classroom learning-station activities which focus on mathematics relating to construction, geometric challenges, and spatial visualization. Activities will connect to the real world and even potential careers. Free exploration sets the stage for such mathematical challenges as Create-A-Shape, Bridge Design, Symmetry, Tangrams, and lots of amazing structures! Background on geometry is provided. Special materials include Lego’s, boxes, pattern blocks, more boxes, and more boxes. This program sounds like great fun, doesn’t it? We will also work on: Reading: letters, sight-words, fluency, and comprehension Math: writing numbers through 20, measurement, greater than & less than, and geometrical shapes & patterns Art: color mixing, water and oil painting outside in the park, create mosaics, and decorating T-shirts Music: dancing, singing Yoga: stretch and learn balance and focus Fieldtrips: The trips may not be far-away and exotic, but they will be fun and educational. Summers are very popular at The Academy. Whether your child has just finished or will start Kindergarten in the fall, this program will inspire them to do their best, because doing your best is fun!!

Summer STEM Mornings (2nd grade - 8th grade)

Overview
Some elementary school children struggled this year. Some did only what was demanded of them. Some sailed through the year without even trying. The rest fell somewhere in between. Regardless of where your 2ndd thru 8th grader* landed, our Summer STEM Mornings program will support, encourage, challenge, and motivate them. Whoever touted the old refrain “learning isn’t fun” never experienced The Academy of 21st Century Learning! Let’s take a peek at our one month program: Math: through Algebra Academic Reading Science: STEM projects & EXPERIMENTS!! For three hours a morning, Monday – Friday, 9AM – 12PM, your kids will laugh, learn, experiment, and challenge themselves. (No summer learning loss for your kids, but don’t tell them!) PLUS, over your family dinner table, you will hear about dissected cow eyes, frogs that dance,and a myriad of other scientific topics that will have them excited about learning. We know many of you were with us the last couple of years so … Welcome Back!!! *Unless special placement is approved by teacher

Friday, June 2, 2017

The World’s Most Mysterious Book - Stephen Bax


Deep inside Yale's Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library lies a 240 page tome. Recently carbon dated to around 1420, its pages feature looping handwriting and hand drawn images seemingly stolen from a dream. It is called the Voynich manuscript, and it’s one of history’s biggest unsolved mysteries. The reason why? No one can figure out what it says. Stephen Bax investigates this cryptic work. 

Lesson by Stephen Bax, animation by TED-Ed.

Tuesday, May 30, 2017

Summer of Reading


Find 9 parent-tested tips for encouraging your child to read all summer long.

As school ends, the push for summer reading begins. We asked parents how they encourage their kids to read when the sun is hot and the days are long. Read on for their advice on motivating reluctant readers and fostering a love of reading in every child.

Make Reading a Ritual
Instill a love of reading early on by making it part of everyday fun.

1. “My daughter's interests are very physical, but she does enjoy going to the library. So, we'll make a field trip out of it — pick up a couple books, and then head to the park with a picnic lunch.” — Lisa C., North Haven, Connecticut

2. “We go on many more road trips and are in the car much more over the summer, so we borrow books on tape from the library.” — Barb G., Omaha, Nebraska

3. “I taught my children (all eight) that reading was a lifelong skill. After discussing the importance of reading we made a family rule: the kids have to read something of their choice for about 30 minutes every day before leaving home or having friends over.” — Sherry M., Shelley, Idaho

Find Motivation That Works
Parents recommend library programs and other cool incentives — and don't forget good old-fashioned praise.

4. “When my children were younger I took them to the library weekly. They had to read a book and then write a report or do a skit. They loved showing off what they learned.” — Michelle G., Foley, Alabama

5. “The kids' school requires them to read a book a week during the summer if they want to go to the ‘book fair’ in the fall. The event features games and other fun activities. We go to the bookstore as a treat, and they ‘get to pick out books’ instead of ‘having to read.’” — Jane A., Crownsville, Maryland

6. “I love to encourage my children to read every chance I get during the summer. We take trips to bookstores and let the kids pick out something of interest. I allow my 9-year-old daughter to read the human-interest story in my People magazine. Being a tween, she thinks that she is so grown-up reading People, and it is something we can share. When school returns, she has not missed a beat.” — Kim D., Braithwaite, Louisiana

Allow Unconventional Choices
Let your child read what interests him — even if it isn't on most teachers' reading lists.

7. “My son is 9, and he has remained an avid Pokémon fan. We have all the Pokémon books. He also likes Star Wars and Yu-Gi-Oh. We have encouraged reading anything! I don't care what he reads as long as he reads.” — Nita C., Florence, New Jersey

8. “My 8-year-old son Trey loves to read during school months but once summer vacation hits he gets lazy! He has joined a fantasy baseball league with his dad. He spends a lot of time reading about the players and the games. He reads online, in the newspaper, in magazines, and even the news blurbs scroll along the bottom of ESPN. He's practicing without even knowing!” — Sarah S., Somerville, Massachusetts

9. “We homeschool, and I let my son choose whatever he wants to read outside our regular curriculum. He reads Bionicle, Pokémon and Yu-Gi-Oh! books, comic books, nature magazines, whatever he wants. I figure if he's reading, he's reading, no matter what it is!” — Leslie D., Cleveland, Tennessee

Article Source: http://www.scholastic.com/parents/resources/article/developing-reading-skills/summer-reading

Saturday, May 27, 2017

How Does Asthma Work? - Christopher E. Gaw


More than 300 million people around the world suffer from asthma, and around 250,000 people die from it each year. But why do people get asthma, and how can this disease be deadly? Christopher E. Gaw describes the main symptoms and treatments of asthma.

Lesson by Christopher E. Gaw, animation by Zedem Media.

Wednesday, May 24, 2017

Register Your Child for Summer Camp - Begins June 12th!


Summer is almost here! Check out our camp schedule and sign up your camper by clicking HERE.

We talk a lot about what our kids are learning in school, but did you know we also know a lot about what happens when they’re not in school during the summer vacation?

Here are some facts:

  • Most students lose about two months of what they learned in math over the summer months.
  • Low-income students lose more than two months in reading achievement.
  • Parents consistently say that summer is the most difficult time to ensure that their children have productive things to do.
  • Our children’s’ need to learn does not end in May when the school doors close. They need to stay active and engaged, which also helps them stay on track academically when they return to school in August.

The Academy to the rescue!
Yes, it’s time to plan ahead and secure a spot for your child in a program that will support growth and learning during the summer months. Don’t worry, you don’t have to tell the kids they are avoiding summer learning-loss. If they are having fun with engaging, well-run pro-grams, trust me, they will be learning.

The Specialty Classes are taught by credentialed teachers or University graduating student-teachers. Small groups and classes keep your child focused and challenged. There will be days when The Academy is transformed into Mars, a rain forest, or an ocean scene.

Questions? Give us a call. (707) 474-4710 or email info@academy21learning.com.

Sunday, May 21, 2017

Capture Your Child's Super Strengths


Turn a talented reader into a math-lover (or vice versa) with these kid-friendly reframing strategies.

Very few people — no matter their age — are good at everything. Some have a knack for numbers, while others struggle with the simplest calculations. Some have a way with words (writers), understand people (psychologists, social workers, teachers), or see the world as a series of lines, colors, and spaces (artists, architects). As adults, we have the option to ignore our weaknesses (or circumvent them, by, say, hiring an accountant).

In school, however, kids don't get to pick and choose their subjects. There's no option to take two art classes and no math (or, for that matter, recess all day). But what they can do is make the most of their strengths, to use their strong skills to improve upon their weak areas. Here's how to help your child be the best student he can be:

If this sounds familiar . . .
My daughter loves to sing. She knows the lyrics to dozens of songs by heart, but when it comes to learning the times tables, she's a mess!
Try this strategy: Auditory learners — children who love to talk and sing, and can't wait for story time — will probably feel overwhelmed by visual cues, such as multiplication charts and tables. Don't despair: using music to teach multiplication is a fairly common and successful technique. There are a slew of multiplication songs available, from simple ditties to rap tracks. Find a CD your child likes, and play the songs often. Reinforce the music by quizzing your child verbally.

If this sounds familiar . . .
My son has always been a strong reader, but he struggles with math.
Try this strategy: The best way to get a good reader more interested in math is to make math seem more like reading. The solution? Word problems. You can find them in your child's textbook, but they're also incredibly easy to make up on your own. Look to whatever book your child is reading for inspiration — Harry Potter, for example: if each goal in Quidditch is worth 10 points, but catching the snitch is worth 150, how many goals is the equivalent of catching the snitch?

If this sounds familiar . . .
My daughter is a whiz at jigsaw puzzles, but she just doesn't get fractions.
Try this strategy: Kids who have strong visual and spatial skills respond well to colors, images, and other visual cues. Try using M&Ms (or dried kidney beans, if you find the chocolates disappear too quickly), pizza pies, or other such props to teach mathematical principles such as addition and subtraction, the times tables, and fractions.

If this sounds familiar . . .
My son is great at math, but his vocabulary needs serious help!
Try this strategy: Get your mathematically inclined child interested in reading with word problems, word search puzzles, and other word games. For example, give your son a list of words (ideally culled from vocabulary lists he gets at school) and ask him to classify them into various categories. The logical part of your son's brain will love the very scientific act of classification, but he'll be expanding his vocabulary at the same time.

If this sounds familiar . . .
My son loves to make up stories, but he's just not interested in science class.
Try this strategy: Creative thinkers do well with "what if . . . " or "imagine that . . . " assignments. Thankfully, this strategy can be applied to almost all subjects. For a science project on recycling, you might suggest to your son, "Imagine that you are an aluminum can. What is your journey like from the time I throw you in the bin until you are something new?" Or, if your son is studying solids, liquids, and gases, ask, "What would you feel like if you were a gas? A liquid? A solid? How would you feel different from one phase to the next?" These questions will get his brain thinking about science topics, but in a manner that he's comfortable with.

Article Source: Scholastic.com

Thursday, May 18, 2017

How Does Your Body Process Medicine? - Céline Valéry


Have you ever wondered what happens to a painkiller, like ibuprofen, after you swallow it? Medicine that slides down your throat can help treat a headache, a sore back, or a throbbing sprained ankle. But how does it get where it needs to go in the first place? Céline Valéry explains how your body processes medicine. 

Lesson by Céline Valéry, animation by Daniel Gray.

Monday, May 15, 2017

Summer School - Ways to Prevent the Summertime Backslide


Worried that your children will forget everything they learned over the course of the summer months away from school? You may have more reason than you think to fear the summer brain drain according to a study by Duke University's Dr. Harris Cooper, a leading expert on summer learning loss. He writes that long summer vacations "break the rhythm of instruction, lead to forgetting, and require a significant amount of review when students return to school in the fall."

According to Cooper's study, students' overall achievement test scores drop by about one month, on average, over summer vacation. Skills in mathematics and spelling usually take the biggest hits, with math skills suffering almost a 2.6 month loss in achievement.

Suffering the most are children from lower socioeconomic backgrounds, who are presented with less opportunities to practice math and reading skills over the summer months than their more privileged peers. Their reading comprehension skills suffer the greatest, and their losses add up to a 2 year achievement gap by the time they enter their middle school years.

There are steps that parents can take to help their children learn and even get ahead over the summer months. Some "Summer Educational Tips" will help transform the break from structured learning into an opportunity for students to sharpen their skills through fun and interactive ways. Follow these tips and send your children back to school smarter and more confident than when they left!

1. Take frequent trips to the library and register your child with a library card. University of Florida's Richard Allington notes that the best predictor of summer reading loss is a lack of books at home and limited access to library books, so keep a good selection of high interest, level appropriate books around the house. Schedule a consistent "reading time" daily for your child.

2. Attend thematic programs at the library. Libraries often host a great variety of summer programs for kids that celebrate reading.

3. Talk to your child's teachers and ask them what your child will be learning next year at school. This way you can tie in family trips with next year's curriculum to create a more meaningful hands-on experience. For example, if your child will be studying a unit on the civil war, plan a visit to Gettysburg.

4. Give your child a gift card to a bookstore, or give books as gifts.

5. Check out audio books from the library for your child to listen to stories in the car.

6. Consider Summer Tutoring: Tutoring services, such as in-home tutoring, can help children catch up or get ahead with one-on-one tutoring in the home. Take advantage of the summer months to remediate or accelerate your child in areas like reading comprehension, mathematics, writing or SAT/ACT test prep.

7. Research has revealed a direct connection between learning to play a musical instrument and an increased aptitude in mathematics. Consider introducing your child to music lessons over the summer.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Cari_Diaz

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/2435060

Friday, May 12, 2017

Check Your Intuition: The Birthday Problem - David Knuffke


Imagine a group of people. How big do you think the group would have to be before there’s more than a 50% chance that two people in the group have the same birthday? The answer is … probably lower than you think. David Knuffke explains how the birthday problem exposes our often-poor intuition when it comes to probability.

Lesson by David Knuffke, animation by TED-Ed.

Tuesday, May 9, 2017

Summer Camp Schedule Available - Register Today!


Summer is almost here! Check out our camp schedule and sign up your camper by clicking HERE.

I know you’re thinking, “But it’s only spring!” I’m a mom, too, and I know how fast summer can creep up on all of us. It’s never too early to start planning for summer learning activities. We talk a lot about what our kids are learning in school, but did you know we also know a lot about what happens when they’re not in school during the summer vacation?

Here are some facts:

  • Most students lose about two months of what they learned in math over the summer months.
  • Low-income students lose more than two months in reading achievement.
  • Parents consistently say that summer is the most difficult time to ensure that their children have productive things to do.
  • Our children’s’ need to learn does not end in May when the school doors close. They need to stay active and engaged, which also helps them stay on track academically when they return to school in August.

The Academy to the rescue!
Yes, it’s time to plan ahead and secure a spot for your child in a program that will support growth and learning during the summer months. Don’t worry, you don’t have to tell the kids they are avoiding summer learning-loss. If they are having fun with engaging, well-run pro-grams, trust me, they will be learning.

The Specialty Classes are taught by credentialed teachers or University graduating student-teachers. Small groups and classes keep your child focused and challenged. There will be days when The Academy is transformed into Mars, a rain forest, or an ocean scene.

Questions? Give us a call. (707) 474-4710 or email info@academy21learning.com.

Saturday, May 6, 2017

The Best-Kept Secret About School Success

Make learning fun for your child, it’s the quickest path to academic success.


Put simply, kids will work tirelessly if the work is gratifying — that is, if it's fun! That doesn't mean all play and little work leads to academic success; far from it. What it does mean is that each child's own perspective about what is fun or interesting (and not fraught with stress) has a direct effect on how hard she is likely to work at assigned tasks.

There is little challenge to teachers, parents, and education policymakers from children who just plain love it all, love to read, love to write, love math, love to please. But for those children who are not meeting expectations in the core subjects, the current prescription — to narrow the curriculum and focus exclusively on reading and math — may be the turnoff of all turnoffs. Doing more and more drills, spending all day every day doing stuff that is dull at best, is not the way to improve achievement.

Finding the Hook
It follows, then, that our challenge with kids who are not achieving is to find the hook — the point of passionate interest that will draw them in. This means that we should not be narrowing school subject matter for poor achievers. In fact, we probably should be doing the opposite. Our most talented teachers have long known this. They wait and watch for the hook to bring an unsuccessful student into the fold. Maybe a child's favorite activity is fishing with Grandpa, something his teacher discovers in time spent listening to and getting to know him. Then why not find books at his reading level about fishing? Why not translate math problems into challenges about whether a fish meets the legal size requirement? Teachers' best clues to the hook for each child are likely to emerge during "specials" or social studies, maybe even in a shop class or during an assembly of guest musicians or jugglers. Field trips of all sorts are rich with opportunities to find those hooks.

Tailor-Made Learning
Above all, adults need to find something that each child can feel successful at, sometimes a classroom job that may involve some easily accomplished reading or math. But don't cut out history for the 3rd grader who is fascinated by the Second World War. Don't rob the artistically inclined child of a lesson in mural-making or a trip to a children's art museum. Bring hands-on gardening into a science unit that might incidentally also involve both math and reading. Whether or not the basic subjects are involved, being able to pursue genuine interests can rejuvenate kids to do the less exciting work that they still must master.

As a parent, you can be an enormous help by encouraging your child's interests and talents. Acknowledge them, admire them, and discuss them with teachers. Who knows your child's particular passions better than you? So don't hold back, thinking that a fascination with horses or submarines is not a worthy subject for school. It is the "flow" experienced in pursuing those interests that hooks kids on learning for life.

Article Source: http://www.scholastic.com/parents/resources/article/motivate-school-success/best-kept-secret-about-school-success

Wednesday, May 3, 2017

Can You Solve the Pirate Riddle? - Alex Gendler


It’s a good day to be a pirate. Amaro and his four mateys – Bart, Charlotte, Daniel, and Eliza have struck gold – a chest with 100 coins. But now, they must divvy up the booty according to the pirate code — and pirate code is notoriously complicated. Can you help come up with the distribution that Amaro should propose to make sure he lives to tell the tale? Alex Gendler shows how.

Lesson by Alex Gendler, animation by Artrake Studio.

Thursday, April 27, 2017

Does Your Child Need School Tutoring?


How do you know when your child needs that extra help to be successful? How do you know when it is time for you to start thinking about school tutoring for your child? You need to familiarize yourself with the warning signs that may indicate your child is having some difficulty in school and understand that if you see any of them you must be willing to step in and take action to help your child. One of the best ways to aid your child in being successful in academic pursuits is school tutoring.

Here are five things to watch for that will indicate your child needs school tutoring:

1. Is your child having difficulty with the foundational skills? The basic skills need to be mastered before other subjects can be effectively tackled. If your child is having problems with skills such as reading and writing then those issues are only going to become exponentially worse as other subjects try to build upon them. Your child needs to get a good head start and build a solid foundation to support future learning.

2. Does your child seem to have an excellent understanding of the classroom material but still brings home poor test scores? You helped him with his homework every night last week and you were very impressed with how well he was doing but when it came time for the test it was like he had forgotten everything. Test taking is a learned skill that is rarely taught in school. School tutoring can help him to learn the proper skills for note taking, studying, and taking tests.

3. Are you just too busy to help your child with his school work? It is nothing to be ashamed of. In this day of single parent households many parents are struggling just to pay the bills and just don't have the time to spend helping their children with their homework like they want to. Your child may just need a little bit of help to get him over that next hill and school tutoring may be just the thing to help him get there and to put your mind at ease.

4. Perhaps you have a child who isn't struggling but is in fact bored with the whole process of school? It is an unfortunate fact in today's educational system that emphasis on standardized test scores means that the students on the lower end get all of the attention and students on the upper end are left unchallenged to sink back toward mediocrity. School tutoring can provide your gifted child with challenges and inspiration to learn on his own and not be held back by the pace of the classroom.

5. Finally, the most important factor to take into consideration is how you feel about the situation. Most parents have very good instincts when it comes to their children. If there are no outward signs that your child may be having difficulties and need help but you still feel something isn't right then listen to your gut. School tutoring can be beneficial for any student so it is much better to error on the side of helping too much rather than too little.

If you want your child to succeed at school, keep these five warning signs in mind. Every child can learn when the material is presented to him in the right way by the right teacher. If your child is struggling you can help him greatly with school tutoring.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Anton_Lebedev

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6380093

Monday, April 24, 2017

Summer Tutoring Is a Good Option


Your child is jumping up and down with joy because school has just let out for the summer. You on the other hand are starting to pull your hair out wondering what you are going to do with him for the summer. Another summer that will be wasted watching television and playing video games just simply does not seem like the best use of his time to you. You do have other options that will be much more beneficial to him, one of which is to get him a summer tutor and give him a head start on his classmates toward the next school year.

First of all, you need to understand that there is a significant learning loss over the course of the summer. Studies have estimated that a student may forget over 40% of what he learned in the last school year just over the three months of summer. This is a significant loss that can have a major impact for a long time to come especially in a cumulative subject like math. This loss can be prevented by the judicious use of summer tutoring. This will help him retain what he learned last year and prepare him to have an easier time when the next school year starts.

Second, summer tutoring will provide your child with a safe, friendly environment that will keep him out of trouble and away from the wrong crowd. Finding a summer tutor that can also be a positive role model will do wonders for your child's self esteem. A little success can go a long way and each new success can increase his confidence exponentially. Tutoring centers are a wonderful option as they can provide a location that you can feel safe about your child going to even if you can't be there due to work.

Thirdly, summer tutoring can instill in him the importance of education. He has always thought that summer meant that there was no reason to learn anything new and was just a time to have fun and goof off. Your interest in providing him with summer tutoring will show him that learning is a year round process and something that he should be taking seriously. You can help him to come to love learning.

You'll really need to convince your child that summer tutoring is in his best interest if you really want him to give up that television and video game for any length of time. But keep in mind that summer tutoring does not just have to be about the subjects that he is learning at school. You can take advantage of the free time he has and his natural curiosity to let him learn about any subject in which he is showing an interest. Allowing your child to enrich himself with the study of subjects that is interested in and enjoys is just as important as making sure that he has a firm grasp on the subjects being taught in the school. The skills that he learns while pursuing subjects that interest him will be skills that he will be able to use when school starts back up. Summer tutoring is something you really should consider for your child.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Anton_Lebedev/437210

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6380104

Friday, April 21, 2017

Tips on Inspiring Kids to Do Homework



Parenting expert Samantha Kemp-Jackson shares six must-know tips on getting your child to do homework.

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Summer Break is Right Around the Corner - Register Your Child for Camp Today!


Summer is just a few months away! Check out our camp schedule and sign up your camper by clicking HERE.

I know you’re thinking, “But it’s only spring!” I’m a mom, too, and I know how fast summer can creep up on all of us. It’s never too early to start planning for summer learning activities. We talk a lot about what our kids are learning in school, but did you know we also know a lot about what happens when they’re not in school during the summer vacation?

Here are some facts:

  • Most students lose about two months of what they learned in math over the summer months.
  • Low-income students lose more than two months in reading achievement.
  • Parents consistently say that summer is the most difficult time to ensure that their children have productive things to do.
  • Our children’s’ need to learn does not end in May when the school doors close. They need to stay active and engaged, which also helps them stay on track academically when they return to school in August.

The Academy to the rescue!
Yes, it’s time to plan ahead and secure a spot for your child in a program that will support growth and learning during the summer months. Don’t worry, you don’t have to tell the kids they are avoiding summer learning-loss. If they are having fun with engaging, well-run pro-grams, trust me, they will be learning.

The Specialty Classes are taught by credentialed teachers or University graduating student-teachers. Small groups and classes keep your child focused and challenged. There will be days when The Academy is transformed into Mars, a rain forest, or an ocean scene.

Questions? Give us a call. (707) 474-4710 or email info@academy21learning.com.

Saturday, April 15, 2017

Why Do Animals Have Such Different Lifespans? - Joao Pedro de Magalhaes


For the microscopic lab worm C. elegans, life equates to just a few short weeks on Earth. The bowhead whale, on the other hand, can live over two hundred years. Why are these lifespans so different? And what does it really mean to ‘age' anyway? Joao Pedro de Magalhaes explains why the pace of aging varies greatly across animals.

Lesson by Joao Pedro de Magalhaes, animation by Sharon Colman.

Wednesday, April 12, 2017

Cute DIY Easter Crafts


DIY expert Denise Wild shows you easy Easter crafts the whole family can make.

Sunday, April 9, 2017

Can You Solve the Virus Riddle? - Lisa Winer


Your research team has found a prehistoric virus preserved in the permafrost and isolated it for study. After a late night working, you’re just closing up the lab when a sudden earthquake hits and breaks all the sample vials. Will you be able to destroy the virus before the vents open and unleash a deadly airborne plague? Lisa Winer shows how.

Lesson by Lisa Winer, animation by Artrake Studio.

Saturday, April 8, 2017

The Top 9 Things to Consider Before Hiring a Tutor


Hiring a tutor for your child or for yourself can be both a confusing and complicated matter. There are at least 2 million tutors in the United States. These individuals may be independent private practice tutors, or they may work for a larger practice, a franchised practice, a community program, a faith based program, or a school based initiative. Whether volunteer or paid, all tutors should abide by the standards of practice and code of ethics as set forth by the National Tutoring Association. All tutors should be trained and certified in the professional practice of tutoring.

So how do you know who will be the best fit for your student? Who will deliver the services best suited for your student's needs and goals? Tutors not only deliver content information, they motivate, coach, challenge, and provide feedback to students. Well trained and experienced tutors work with the student's overall study skills, not just the academic assignment at hand.

Hiring a tutor should be approached in the same manner as hiring any other professional. Ask questions, look carefully at references, and use your instinct as to whether this tutor is a good fit for your student. Your student should be present at the initial interview so that you can receive feedback from your student before making a final hiring decision.

Ask about the following . . . .

* Credentials - Don't be afraid to ask for proof of credentials, i.e. transcript copies, copies of state teaching certificates, tutor certification, proof of other specialized training. Ask the tutor to provide a complete resume.

* A Tutorial Plan -- Give the tutor a list of your concerns and goals for your student. Ask the tutor to offer a basic plan for how he or she will assist your child. How will the tutor conduct an initial assessment of your student's academic needs and challenges? How will success be measured? When will feedback be provided to you and/or the student's teacher?

* Letters of Recommendation -- Make sure that the letters speak to the person's ability as a tutor and not just matters of general character. Letters should be current and include full contact information for the person making the recommendation. Above all, make the calls necessary to verify these recommendations.

* Demonstration -- Watch the tutor guide your student through a small portion of one lesson. How does the tutor approach the student? Where does the tutor sit; does the tutor respect your child's personal space? How is the tutor's intent conveyed to your student? Does the tutor write on your student's paper or does the tutor allow the student to make corrections as needed? Is your student allowed to ask numerous questions? Is the tutor patient, professional in mannerism, tone of voice and information delivery? Does the tutor give your student time to process and answer the question before offering the solution? Does the tutor offer sincere praise?

* Fees - Ask the tutor for a detailed pricing plan, i.e. how many sessions at what cost per session. Be sure you are clear about payment requirements, rules about missed appointments, and miscellaneous fees for testing and materials.

* Location -- Where will the tutor meet your student? At your home with supervision? In a public place such as a library? In a dedicated learning center? Tutors should never meet with your student in a location where there is no other adult present.

* Insurance -- Does the tutor carry professional liability insurance? Has the tutor been recently background checked?

* Professional Affiliations - To what professional association does the tutor belong? How does the tutor participate in the overall improvement of the tutorial practice? Does the tutor stay current regarding innovative methods and strategies?

* Additional Questions -- How long have you been tutoring? Why do you enjoy tutoring? How many students are you currently working with? When do you become frustrated with students? How do you communicate with a student who clearly isn't "getting it"? How do you define your role as the tutor? What is my role as the parent? How will you communicate with my student's teacher(s) and how often?

Finally, if any red flag sends off an internal warning signal, do not hire that tutor. You are the person who knows your student better than anyone else. You and your student must feel comfortable in this tutorial relationship. The bottom line is that no matter who recommends the tutor, interview more than one tutor if you have any nagging thoughts in the back of your mind when making the hiring decision.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Chuckie_Stew

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/2853543

Monday, April 3, 2017

Why Do People Get So Anxious About Math? - Orly Rubinsten


Have you ever sat down to take a math test and immediately felt your heart beat faster and your palms start to sweat? This is called math anxiety, and if it happens to you, you’re not alone: Researchers think about 20 percent of the population suffers from it. So what’s going on? And can it be fixed? Orly Rubinsten explores the current research and suggests ways to increase math performance.

Lesson by Orly Rubinsten, animation by Adriatic Animation.

Friday, March 31, 2017

Our 2017 Summer Camp Schedule is Now Available - Register Today!


Summer is just a few months away! Check out our camp schedule and sign up your camper by clicking HERE.

I know you’re thinking, “But it’s only spring!” I’m a mom, too, and I know how fast summer can creep up on all of us. It’s never too early to start planning for summer learning activities. We talk a lot about what our kids are learning in school, but did you know we also know a lot about what happens when they’re not in school during the summer vacation?

Here are some facts:

  • Most students lose about two months of what they learned in math over the summer months.
  • Low-income students lose more than two months in reading achievement.
  • Parents consistently say that summer is the most difficult time to ensure that their children have productive things to do.
  • Our children’s’ need to learn does not end in May when the school doors close. They need to stay active and engaged, which also helps them stay on track academically when they return to school in August.

The Academy to the rescue!
Yes, it’s time to plan ahead and secure a spot for your child in a program that will support growth and learning during the summer months. Don’t worry, you don’t have to tell the kids they are avoiding summer learning-loss. If they are having fun with engaging, well-run pro-grams, trust me, they will be learning.

The Specialty Classes are taught by credentialed teachers or University graduating student-teachers. Small groups and classes keep your child focused and challenged. There will be days when The Academy is transformed into Mars, a rain forest, or an ocean scene.

Questions? Give us a call. (707) 474-4710 or email info@academy21learning.com.

Tuesday, March 28, 2017

Don't Fear the Fair: 8 Tips to Make Your Child's Science Fair Project Fun

From brainstorming experiments through practicing presentations, help your child develop the perfect science fair project.


Science fairs have a bad reputation, but if you approach them with creativity, patience, and an open mind, you’ll be amazed at what your child can do. Here are eight tips to help you get started, as you guide your child:

1. There's no need to panic. Science doesn’t have to be expensive, dangerous or terribly complicated. With the Internet at your fingertips, there are countless resources waiting to spark ideas in your young scientist.

2. Let your child take the lead. Every kid is inspired by something, whether it’s baking, music, basketball, or slime. Let her choose the project (within reason, of course), make the supply list, design the poster, and everything else. As a parent, your job is to encourage your child, ask her lots of questions, and keep your hands off of her project unless there’s a safety concern.

3. You don't have to start from scratch, unless you want to. It’s may be helpful to start with an existing science experiment and make it your own. Encourage your child to peruse the Internet or a book to find a project he's interested in. Let him try it and ask him what else he could learn using the same method, or what other things he could try. Encourage him to put his own stamp on it.

4. All ideas have merit. Let your child brainstorm and try things out, even if you don’t think something will work, or it’s not the way you’d do things. In science, invention and success are often the result of a series of failures. The entire process of experimental design should be a learning experience. Is there a way to make her project interactive for her audience? The more imaginative she is, the better.

5. Ask your child what he wants to learn, what he thinks will happen, and how he's going to test it. Does your amateur chef want to learn whether it’s possible to keep strawberries from getting moldy by boiling them for a few seconds? How long does he think a strawberry should be boiled to keep it fresh longer? Will five seconds of boiling stop mold growth? (A guess about what will happen based on what is already known is called a hypothesis.) How can he test his hypothesis? How can what he learns benefit society?

6. Take your time. Remember, your child has to come up with an idea, research it, do the experiments, and create a presentation. If you and your child wait until the day before the science fair, you may be able to pull it off, but the experience will be far less rewarding.

7. Think before you draw. Invest in a decent tri-fold cardboard display board. Avoid having your child start writing directly on the board, but encourage her to make a mock-up of what her poster will look like, and then to write, draw, or print images and information on printer paper that can be attached to the display board. Colorful construction paper makes a nice background for plain whiter printer paper and creative design is always a bonus.

8. Practice. Encourage your child to practice his presentation several times until he's comfortable explaining what he did. Be sure that he's pronouncing any unfamiliar words correctly. Have him make a list of questions that he thinks people might ask and practice answering. Most importantly, remind him that it’s okay to say, “I don’t know, but that’s a great question.”

Finally, as your child dives into her project, try to suppress any desire you might have to take control. Remember that his learning is a journey. Messes and mistakes are part of the creative process, and any project that your child completes — and feels great about — is a genuine science fair success.

Feature Photo Credit: © FatCamera/iStockphoto. Other photos © Quarry Books, 2016/Kitchen Science Lab for Kids and Liz Heinecke.

Article Source: http://www.scholastic.com/parents/blogs/scholastic-parents-learning-toolkit/dont-fear-fair-8-tips-to-make-your-childs-science-fair