Thursday, August 31, 2017

Helping Your Kids Succeed in School



Watch and learn about the top four things parents can do to help their kids succeed in school.

Monday, August 28, 2017

The Amazing Ways Plants Defend Themselves - Valentin Hammoudi


Plants are constantly under attack. They face threats ranging from microscopic fungi to small herbivores like caterpillars, up to large herbivores like elephants. But plants are ready, with a whole series of internal and external defenses that make them a less appealing meal — or even a deadly one. Valentin Hammoudi explains some of the fascinating ways that plants defend themselves.

Lesson by Valentin Hammoudi, animation by Juan M. Urbina Studios.

Friday, August 25, 2017

4 Helpful Habits for Back-to-School Season

The new school year is a great time to implement daily practices to further your child's literacy skills.


Very soon we'll be trading in the sound of the ice cream truck bell for the sound of the school bell. The start of a new school year is right around the corner. With the season comes the opportunity to put in place some back-to-school habits that can help your children build their literacy skills.

Here are four practical ideas to help your family kick-off the school year.

1. Keep Up With a Reading Log

Many schools request children to read at home several times a week. Even if the school does not require daily reading, it's still one of the best habits to put in place at home.

Keeping a reading log will help your kids track the books they read. When your kids can look back and see how many books they read each month, it provides a sense of accomplishment.

Writing down the titles or minutes read each day will also give your child a little extra handwriting practice. They might even give each book a star rating system and critique each book that is read.

A weekly or bi-weekly trip to the public library will ensure that you have plenty of reading material on hand. The 6th Edition Scholastic Kids & Family Reading Report shows a majority of kids agree “it is very important for their future to be a good reader,” but only one in three is a frequent reader. So, don't forget to let your kids choose their own books for reading at home.

2. Create a Nightly Reading Routine

In our house, we follow a "triple B" nighttime routine: bath, books, and bed.

Right before their bath time, my kids pick out two or three books that they want to have read aloud that night. They lay their chosen books on the bed where they'll be ready to read right after they take their baths and put on pajamas. Each night, my husband and I alternate reading to the kids. Then, once the books are done, it's time for bed. (You can also choose books before dinner, if your kids don't bathe before bed.)

Need some read-aloud ideas? Check out these books parents love to read to their kids.

3. Have Dinnertime Discussions

Take advantage of your captive audience at the dinner table each night. Implement a 'no screens policy' so that distractions will be limited, which in turn will encourage conversation. Here are a couple of prompts to connect as a family:

  • Tell us something you learned today.
  • Share something that you were proud of today.
  • What is something that you wished didn't happen today?
  • What are you most looking forward to tomorrow?


Using the prompts above will help you learn about what successes and struggles your kids experienced during the day. The last prompt will help your child think ahead to a new day.

For more activities to help build literacy skills at the table, see how to practice storytelling with kids at dinnertime and three ways to build vocabulary at dinner.

4. Plan Ahead

If you know that Wednesday nights are soccer practice and Thursday nights are piano lessons, plan ahead to squeeze in literacy learning.

Your kids can listen to audiobooks in the car on the way to practice. Start with these five awesome audiobooks.

Or, you can quiz your kids on their spelling words while you drive. If you still have a few minutes, ask your kids to tell you about the last book they read.

Putting a few habits in place now will have you feeling prepared and confident when the school bell rings.

To learn more helpful tips for success, get great book recommendations, and find out what to expect for each grade, check out the Start Smart: Back-to-School Guide.

Article Source: http://www.scholastic.com/parents/blogs/scholastic-parents-raise-reader/4-helpful-habits-back-to-school-season

Tuesday, August 22, 2017

Cell Membranes are Way More Complicated Than You Think - Nazzy Pakpour


Cell membranes are structures of contradictions. These oily films are hundreds of times thinner than a strand of spider silk, yet strong enough to protect the delicate contents of life: the cell’s watery cytoplasm, genetic material, organelles, and all the molecules it needs to survive. How does the membrane work, and where does that strength come from? Nazzy Pakpour investigates.

Lesson by Nazzy Pakpour, animation by Zedem Media.

Saturday, August 19, 2017

This Guy Explains Why the Solar Eclipse Will Blow Your Mind | Short Film Showcase


On August 21st, 2017, millions of people in the United States will watch as the sun, moon, and earth align for a rare and extraordinary event—a total solar eclipse.

Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Getting Better Grades With Tutoring


There is nothing harder on a parent than to see their child suffer in any way. We all want our children to succeed and achieve their dreams. We don't want our children to be ridiculed by their peers. If your child is struggling to succeed in school there is a great opportunity for getting better grades with tutoring. Have you considered that the reason your child uses homework excuses is because he/she can't handle the stress of working on something he doesn't understand? If your child is not goofing off in school and has a genuine need and agrees, hiring a tutor is one way to help him/her out.

Finding a tutor for your child should be a decision based on what is best for your child, input from you and your child as well as consultation with your child's teacher to discuss your child's learning strengths, weaknesses and style. A tutor can not only teach the material, but can also give your child suggested ways to do homework more efficiently, approaches or tricks to test taking, motivation and an assessment of the child's learning style.

Tutoring Pay Rates

The rates paid to tutors for their services are not regulated, so there is no way to judge what you will have to pay. If the tutor has a high degree of education, they may charge more than a college tutor might charge. Setting yourself a budget and deciding where you can cut corners may be necessary to ensure that you can pay for the tutoring. A professional tutor, because of their experience, will likely be more able to adapt to your child's learning style/difficulties than a tutor that you hire from a college.

How to Find a Tutor Online

If you search online, you'll find many sites with a list of tutors in your town or city. These sites will have the tutor's contact information available for you to use. The site will have somewhat of a biography of the tutor, listing the tutor's education, grade levels they want to teach, etc.

Another option would be to check your local college or university website to see if they have students available that offer tutoring services. The rates charged by college students may be lower than those charged by professional tutors and there may be an agreement in place between your child's school and the university or college. Some schools may assist with the payment to the tutor.

There are also companies that specialize in tutoring. They have a big online presence and their sites are full of information on the types of tutoring being offered at their location.

All of the choices above are great to use as a tutor finder and have a lot of information to enable you to make the right decision for you and your child. Imagine your child getting better grades with tutoring because the tutor was able to get through to your child using a different style of teaching.

How will that positively impact your child's and your life?


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Scott_A_Millers/837209

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6066397

Sunday, August 13, 2017

Will the Ocean Ever Run Out of Fish? - Ayana Elizabeth Johnson and Jennifer Jacquet


When most people think of fishing, we imagine relaxing in a boat and patiently reeling in the day’s catch. But modern industrial fishing -- the kind that stocks our grocery shelves -- looks more like warfare. Ayana Elizabeth Johnson and Jennifer Jacquet explain overfishing and its effects on ecosystems, food security, jobs, economies, and coastal cultures.

Lesson by Ayana Elizabeth Johnson and Jennifer Jacquet, animation by Anton Bogaty.

Thursday, August 10, 2017

Tips to Get Your Kids Back on a School Routine


Did late-night sleepovers and extra free time throw off your kid’s schedule? Make a smooth transition into the new school year with these tips.

Monday, August 7, 2017

What Happens When You Have a Concussion? - Clifford Robbins


Each year in the United States, players of sports and recreational activities receive between 2.5 and 4 million concussions. How dangerous are all those concussions? The answer is complicated and lies in how the brain responds when something strikes it. Clifford Robbins explains the science behind concussions.

Lesson by Clifford Robbins, animation by Boniato Studio.

Friday, August 4, 2017

How to Prepare for Back to School


Ease your children back into their school schedule with these parent-tested tips.

Step 1: Reset their body clock
If your children have been staying up late and sleeping in all summer, reset their body clocks: Starting two weeks before school, send them to bed a little bit earlier every night -- and get them up a little earlier every morning -- until they're back on a school-day schedule.

Tip
Get them used to the impending morning rush by planning early-morning activities they'll want to jump out of bed for.

Step 2: Take them shopping
Take them shopping for school supplies and, if your budget permits, a few new back-to-school clothes. Let them have a say in the selection process to get them excited about the return to the classroom.

Step 3: Prepare their work area
Help them prepare the area where they'll be doing their homework, especially if they seem anxious about the upcoming year. Having a clean, organized space with some new supplies may help ease their nerves -- and might even get them excited about a fresh start.

Tip
Surprise them with a new electronic gadget that can be used to do homework. Check out websites like eBay and Craigslist for bargains.

Step 4: Set up playdates
Set up playdates with school friends they haven't seen all summer to remind them that the school year has its fun side.

Tip
If you're child is starting at a new school, see if it's possible to have them meet their new teacher before the school year starts.

Step 5: Cook ahead
Make double batches of meals now so you can quickly defrost dinner during those first hectic days.

Step 6: Tamp down your own fears
Keep any of your own anxieties about the upcoming school year to yourself. Children take their lead from you; if you seem composed, it may alleviate their own fears.

Did You Know?
Up to 18 percent of children display anxiety over returning to school in the fall that can lead them to be disruptive in class, according to one study.

Tuesday, August 1, 2017

The Power of Reading Aloud


It’s never too early to start reading aloud to your kids – and keep reading – even as your little ones get older. Scholastic Librarian Deimosa Webber-Bey and a group of young readers, aged 7-12, share their tips on making the most out of family read-alouds.