Friday, July 20, 2018

10 Ways to Motivate Your Child to Learn


Inspire her thirst for knowledge inside and outside of school.

If you want your child to be a stellar student, don't limit learning to the walls of his classroom. Although the skills he's learning there are crucial to his intellectual and social growth, your child needs your help to open up the world of ideas. His renewed joy in discovery will transfer to his schoolwork, so you'll boost his academic achievement too!

  1. Fill your child's world with reading. Take turns reading with your older child, or establish a family reading time when everyone reads her own book. Demonstrate how important reading is to you by filling your home with printed materials: novels, newspapers, even posters and placemats with words on them.
  2. Encourage him to express his opinion, talk about his feelings, and make choices. He can pick out a side dish to go with dinner and select his own extracurricular activities. Ask for his input on family decisions, and show that you value it.
  3. Show enthusiasm for your child's interests and encourage her to explore subjects that fascinate her. If she's a horse nut, offer her stories about riding or challenge her to find five facts about horses in the encyclopedia.
  4. Provide him with play opportunities that support different kinds of learning styles — from listening and visual learning to sorting and sequencing. Supplies that encourage open-ended play, such as blocks, will develop your child’s creative expression and problem-solving skills as he builds. He'll need lots of unstructured play time to explore them.
  5. Point out the new things you learn with enthusiasm. Discuss the different ways you find new information, whether you're looking for gardening tips on the Internet or taking a night class in American literature.
  6. Ask about what he's learning in school, not about his grades or test scores. Have him teach you what he learned in school today — putting the lesson into his own words will help him retain what he learned.
  7. Help your child organize her school papers and assignments so she feels in control of her work. If her task seems too daunting, she'll spend more time worrying than learning. Check in with her regularly to make sure she's not feeling overloaded.
  8. Celebrate achievements, no matter how small. Completing a book report calls for a special treat; finishing a book allows your child an hour of video games. You'll offer positive reinforcement that will inspire him to keep learning and challenging himself.
  9. Focus on strengths, encouraging developing talents. Even if she didn't ace her math test, she may have written a good poem in English class. In addition to a workbook for math practice, give her a writing journal.
  10. Turn everyday events into learning opportunities. Encourage him to explore the world around him, asking questions and making connections.

Tuesday, July 17, 2018

The Second Session of Our Popular "Checkmate - Chess for Kids" Camp Begins July 30 - Register Today!!


Checkmate - Chess for Kids
(Ages 8 - 18)
July 30 - August 3, 2018 
1:30 pm - 3:30 pm


Girls and Boys!

Discover a new world on 64 squares! Chess is a game that emphasizes many developmental, social and problem-solving skills. Research studies have shown that chess can improve memory and imagination, and lead to higher verbal, reading and math scores.

If your child has never played before or has played a lot, this class is designed to accommodate participants of beginning and intermediate skill levels.

Beginners will be able to play a full game of chess by the end of the week, and students with basic knowledge will receive tailored instruction.

For students who appreciate the challenge and competition, the game provides, more intense instruction is available. Instruction is provided by Robert Dwyer.

A pretty-darn-good player in his own right, Mr. Rob possesses the unique ability to make students feel capable and proud of what they have accomplished on the board. Checkmate!

Saturday, July 14, 2018

What is the Coldest Thing in the World? - Lina Marieth Hoyos


The coldest materials in the world aren’t in Antarctica or at the top of Mount Everest. They’re in physics labs: clouds of gases held just fractions of a degree above absolute zero. Lina Marieth Hoyos explains how temperatures this low give scientists a window into the inner workings of matter, and allow engineers to build incredibly sensitive instruments that tell us more about the universe.

Lesson by Lina Marieth Hoyos, animation by Adriatic Animation.

Wednesday, July 11, 2018

Capture Your Child's Super Strengths


Turn a talented reader into a math-lover (or vice versa) with these kid-friendly reframing strategies.

Very few people — no matter their age — are good at everything. Some have a knack for numbers, while others struggle with the simplest calculations. Some have a way with words (writers), understand people (psychologists, social workers, teachers), or see the world as a series of lines, colors, and spaces (artists, architects). As adults, we have the option to ignore our weaknesses (or circumvent them, by, say, hiring an accountant).

In school, however, kids don't get to pick and choose their subjects. There's no option to take two art classes and no math (or, for that matter, recess all day). But what they can do is make the most of their strengths, to use their strong skills to improve upon their weak areas. Here's how to help your child be the best student he can be:

If this sounds familiar . . .
My daughter loves to sing. She knows the lyrics to dozens of songs by heart, but when it comes to learning the times tables, she's a mess!
Try this strategy: Auditory learners — children who love to talk and sing, and can't wait for story time — will probably feel overwhelmed by visual cues, such as multiplication charts and tables. Don't despair: using music to teach multiplication is a fairly common and successful technique. There are a slew of multiplication songs available, from simple ditties to rap tracks. Find a CD your child likes, and play the songs often. Reinforce the music by quizzing your child verbally.

If this sounds familiar . . .
My son has always been a strong reader, but he struggles with math.
Try this strategy: The best way to get a good reader more interested in math is to make math seem more like reading. The solution? Word problems. You can find them in your child's textbook, but they're also incredibly easy to make up on your own. Look to whatever book your child is reading for inspiration — Harry Potter, for example: if each goal in Quidditch is worth 10 points, but catching the snitch is worth 150, how many goals is the equivalent of catching the snitch?

If this sounds familiar . . .
My daughter is a whiz at jigsaw puzzles, but she just doesn't get fractions.
Try this strategy: Kids who have strong visual and spatial skills respond well to colors, images, and other visual cues. Try using M&Ms (or dried kidney beans, if you find the chocolates disappear too quickly), pizza pies, or other such props to teach mathematical principles such as addition and subtraction, the times tables, and fractions.

If this sounds familiar . . .
My son is great at math, but his vocabulary needs serious help!
Try this strategy: Get your mathematically inclined child interested in reading with word problems, word search puzzles, and other word games. For example, give your son a list of words (ideally culled from vocabulary lists he gets at school) and ask him to classify them into various categories. The logical part of your son's brain will love the very scientific act of classification, but he'll be expanding his vocabulary at the same time.

If this sounds familiar . . .
My son loves to make up stories, but he's just not interested in science class.
Try this strategy: Creative thinkers do well with "what if . . . " or "imagine that . . . " assignments. Thankfully, this strategy can be applied to almost all subjects. For a science project on recycling, you might suggest to your son, "Imagine that you are an aluminum can. What is your journey like from the time I throw you in the bin until you are something new?" Or, if your son is studying solids, liquids, and gases, ask, "What would you feel like if you were a gas? A liquid? A solid? How would you feel different from one phase to the next?" These questions will get his brain thinking about science topics, but in a manner that he's comfortable with.

Article Source: Scholastic.com

Sunday, July 8, 2018

RoboGeeks Summer Camp is July 16 - 20 - Registration Closes in 4 Days!


RoboGeeks 
(1st - 3rd grade) 
Jul 16 - 20, 2018 
1:30 pm - 3:30 pm


Want to build a robot that will obey your every command? It's time to start programming for our Robo-geeks!

The Academy of 21st Century Learning is ready to teach your child all about building and coding!

In this course, we will explore real-world applications of mathematics, engineering, physics, and coding. Your child will experience every stage of developing a product from preliminary design to beta testing. Using Lego Boost, our future engineers will use critical thinking and strategic problem-solving skills to conquer various robotic challenges.

Come to experience Robotics … Academy-Style! This course will be unlike any you have ever encountered before!

Thursday, July 5, 2018

Coral Reefs 101 | National Geographic


What are coral reefs? Coral can be found in tropical ocean waters around the world. But how much do you know about reefs and the tiny animals—polyps—that build them? Learn all about coral and why warming waters threaten the future of the reef ecosystem.

Monday, July 2, 2018

Considering Summer Tutoring?


Are you considering summer tutoring for your child? The end of the school year is approaching and many parents are thinking about preparing for a child's summer plans. If tutoring has crossed your mind here are a few things to consider about whether or not it's a good idea.

Summer tutoring can help a child with advancement or enrichment of subjects, preparation for standardized tests such as the SAT or ACT, review of foundations or concepts, and development of good study skills and habits. On the flip side, a child can view lessons as an unwanted activity that interferes with a carefree and fun summer.

If you decide that tutoring is necessary or preferred for your child there are ways to arrange lessons so that they don't prevent your child from having a great summer. It's important to incorporate fun and cool activities such as going to the pool, playing sports, creating art, and taking trips so that your child will have things to look forward to. Additionally, carefully select your tutor. Look for someone who has a good background and great personality. The chemistry and rapport between a tutor and your child will influence how your child will feel about lessons. In my own teaching experience, I try to make my lessons as fun and interesting as possible and a parent has told me that his daughter never complains about coming to our lessons together (he let me know that she complains about having to attend other activities).

Set aside a stable structure for lessons. Families often take a vacation or time off and this is fine but continuity of lessons is critical for progress. Don't cancel on lessons often or take them less seriously because it is summer. However, don't take them too seriously. If you take time off and reschedule a lesson don't apply extra pressure for the makeup. Slow and steady growth is ideal.

If you can't find the right tutor or your child revolts at the idea think about letting lessons slide. In my opinion, it is usually unproductive to force a child to do something when he or she is rebelling against it. This could also cause a negative feeling overall towards academics.

Summer lessons don't have to be viewed by your child as a nuisance. Learning should be seen as a positive experience.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Soumonie_Heng/603153

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/4038755